Traditionally, kitchen gardens were separate from formal parts of a house’s outdoor space. In larger homes, this was often in a walled garden, to protect the produce from harsh weather and scavengers.

Potagers, or ornamental kitchen gardens, were popularised during the French Renaissance.  Edible and non-edible flowers were placed alongside vegetables, and the gardens were laid out in a way that was both pleasing to the eye and practical.

Here are seven kitchen gardens that show how growing your own fruit and vegetables can be incorporated into any garden design scheme.

If you think growing your own at home is for you, click here to see our vegetable gardener’s calendar

An old vicarage with a kitchen garden

Set within a three-and-a-half-acre country plot, this garden is filled with a glorious array of colours, scents and flavours in late summer, which would inspire anyone to grab their trowel and start growing their own food with enthusiasm.

and old vicarage with kitchen gardens

Take a look around this fruitful kitchen garden

Within the garden, owner Sandra Blaza operates a system of crop rotation, so that each main group of vegetables – brassica, potatoes, onions, root vegetables, and legumes – is grown in a different spot each year. An interesting feature of the garden is the inclusion of half-standard gooseberry and currant bushes in the corners of these vegetable beds. This unusual way of growing and training soft fruit adds height and structure, and shows off the fruit to great effect.


Traditional cottage garden in Hampshire

Among the relaxed planting of this traditional cottage garden in Hampshire, there is a beautiful terraced kitchen garden. Sweet peas, alstroemeria and foxtail lilies add an injection of colour to the area and thrive alongside an old clump of delphiniums. In the lower beds, the home owner Penny grows soft fruit, blackberries and raspberries, while broccoli, onions, parsnips, beans, potatoes and lettuces make up the vegetable beds.

patchwork vegetable gardens in a traditional kitchen garden

Click here to take a tour of this Hampshire cottage garden

If you’d love to transform your our outdoor space into a cottage garden, take a look at our expert advice on how to create a traditional cottage garden.


Floral family garden

While this is mainly a family garden, owner Joanne Winn has developed a productive kitchen garden that is her private area to withdraw to. It is a sunny patch, with raised beds containing vegetables and soft fruit, and there is a small greenhouse. This is Joanne’s favourite spot, where she’s most likely to be found, even in the depths of winter. ‘It’s my haven, I suppose. I love its calm serenity and feeling of enclosure,’ she says.

vegetable plots in a trellaced kitchen garden

Discover the rest of this beautiful family garden

Herbs, potatoes, onions and salad leaves thrive in the secluded little patch, whilst a beautiful calendula plant acts as a companion, bringing in insects and wildlife to keep the kitchen garden producing.


A bluebell wood with a productive garden

The owner of this garden, Barbara Jeremiah, is the Liveryman for the Worshipful Company of Gardeners, so it is no surprise that her kitchen garden is outstanding. A raised fruit bed and vegetable plot offer a variety of produce, and are backed by espaliered ‘Charles Ross’ and russet apple trees.

garden bench in a vegetable plot

‘Part of this garden is set out in a chequerboard design using old square bricks that were made here hundreds of years ago,’ says Barbara. ‘These are filled with herbs such as parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme, chives, fennel, lovage, chervil, mint and curry plants. I put mint, parsley and tulips in pots, as it’s easier to look after them, and the tomatoes in a small greenhouse.’

Raised beds with fruit trees and bean poles in kitchen gardens

Ttake a look around this enchanting bluebell garden, designed by an artistic eye


Bountiful artist’s garden

In late summer, artist Lizzie Smith’s garden is at its zenith, with a cornucopia of vegetables in raised beds ready for harvest, billowing flowers to cut and the herbaceous beds filled out with golden Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii ‘Goldsturm’, Nepeta ‘Six Hills Giant’ and Cynara cardunculus, or cardoons.

‘Our wish was to develop a productive, beautiful and creative garden for our family, friends and wildlife to enjoy being in and eating from. We have six children between us, so the garden is a great source of fresh vegetables and flowers, with lovely places to be in,’ says Lizzie.

The variety of produce is impressive, from herbs such as mint, rosemary, thyme and parsley at the front door, to tactile Cavolo Nero mixed with ornamental Cerinthe major ‘Purpurascens’ kept in check in the woven-edged beds, or ripening Victoria plums heavy on the bough. There is something edible in nearly every corner of the garden.

The garden has two main areas for vegetables, with large rectangular beds, along with the more tender offerings of chillies and aubergines in the polytunnel. ‘Tomatoes are our favourite vegetable and we grow ‘Black Krim’, ‘Marmande’, ‘San Marzano’ and ‘Costoluto Fiorentino’.’


A kitchen garden with contemporary touches

The kitchen aspect of this garden isn’t the most obvious part. In fact it is used to punctuate the relaxed and colourful planting of the traditional cottage scheme. Neat rows of salad and root vegetables sit between repeated box-balls and have all been hand grown by home owner Heather Scott from seed. The tiny greenhouse is home to Heather’s young potted plants and vegetables, before they can graduate into the main garden, to complement the beds.


Family garden in the Essex countryside

Having created a beautiful garden for her family, Victoria Inglis turned her attention to creating a small potager outside their potting shed, which is enclosed in woven hazel fences. ‘My husband and three children are quite “foodie”, so we enjoy cooking at home with our own produce. Raised beds made from wooden planks are filled with salad leaves, rhubarb, beans and root vegetables,’ says Victoria.

kitchen gardens with raised beds and wicker fencing

To finish off the kitchen garden, Victoria extended the small eating area on the south-easterly corner of the potting shed, and built a pergola, creating the perfect outdoor dining area to complement the productive kitchen garden.

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